Telisa Yancy, Director Advertising, Brand and Media

Recent content by this author:

  • Krispy Kreme Continues to Leverage the Social Web to Empower Consumers to Own and Keep the Brand Alive

    Blogs   October 23, 2011  

    Although Krispy Kreme Doughnuts has just under 800 stores, in 21 countries, CMO Dwayne Chambers, states that the company is NOT in the business of increasing same store sales, or growing traffic, or average check numbers. No, those are simply the results of executing flawlessly against their true objective: "to build positive meaningful relationships, first, with our team, second, with our guest and third, with our community"

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  • “These Are Amazing Times…Leverage Your Brand to Exploit Them”

    Blogs   October 22, 2011  

    Depending on who you ask, the current environment for marketers might be described with words, like: crazy, busy, overwhelming — some might even say “insane”! Building great brands, and telling great stories is now just a portion of what marketers are expected to contribute to their organizations. If you really want to a list of what marketers do daily, you’d have to add a number of new disciplines including, driving the growth agenda, discovering new markets and new ways to connect to consumers, and most importantly, defending the marketing investment — daily.

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  • Inspiring Consumers Enough to Grow During a Recession

    Blogs   October 22, 2011  

    According to Cheryl Callan, SVP of Marketing for Weight Watchers, the “Do it Yourself” weight loss industry is a $460 Billion Dollar industry. Since its founding, Weight Watchers has competed as social business in the sub category of the industry, called weight management (this portion of the weight loss industry is a $3.7BB dollar industry). The growth dilemma facing Weight Watchers was how to be as a “social” business when the service they provide consumers is the ultimate purchase that “can wait”.

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  • Marketing as the Organizing Principle for Growth

    Blogs   October 22, 2011  

    If you asked 20 people on the streets of New York or Chicago, “what is marketing,” you might get 30 different answers. Those answers would range from statements that describe specific functions of marketing, like advertising, to those that describe one of the results of marketing, like “it’s convincing people to buy.” Some people might even describe it as a specific department.

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