Defining Your Marketing Promise in Three Steps | Training Takeaways | All MKC Content | ANA

Defining Your Marketing Promise in Three Steps

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Too often, brands put their "what" and their "how" before their "why." They place priority on their products' functional benefits and the means whereby those benefits are delivered to induce a transactional exchange with their customers. Placing priority on your "why," however — on your brand's reason for being — offers the opportunity to establish a much deeper, more meaningful, and ultimately more enduring and remunerative connection with your customer.

Your company's "why" is articulated in your marketing promise, which can be established in three steps adapted from Seth Godin's This Is Marketing and laid out by the ANA's on-demand training course, "Establishing an Effective Digital Brand Connection."

The first element of a marketing promise begins, "My product is for people who believe ..." It puts the customer and his or her core commitments first. It says, "I see you." An eyewear company might maintain, "My product is for people who believe that eyeglasses are an extension of myself." A grammar-correction software provider might maintain, "My product is for people who believe that everyone can be a great writer."

The second element of a marketing promise specifies the customers' desire and continues, "I will focus on people who want ..." The eyewear company might complete the statement by saying, "I will focus on people who want good-looking, stylish eyewear without breaking the bank." The grammar-correction software provider might say, "I will focus on people who want confidence that their written communications are correct and effective."

The third and final element of the marketing promise concludes, "I promise that engaging with my product will help you get ..." The eyewear company might pledge, "I promise that engaging with my product will help you get glasses that make a statement." The grammar software provider might pledge, "I promise that engaging with my product will help you get confidence that you are putting your best foot forward in your writing."

The guidance above represents just a morsel from the banquet of insights and best practices offered by the ANA's on-demand training course, "Establishing an Effective Digital Brand Connection."

TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE COURSE AND REGISTER, CLICK HERE

Source

"Establishing an Effective Digital Brand Connection." Jay Mandel, founder of and principal at Your Brand Coach. ANA On-Demand Training Course.

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