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Marketing Maestros

Think Big. Be Fearless. Push for the Best.

By Andrew Eitelbach, senior manager of marketing and communications
Posted: May 21, 2015 5:30am ET
Dana Anderson cannot be stopped. The chief marketing officer at Mondelēz International, she has been unrelenting in pushing some very well-known brands (such as Oreo, Honey Maid, and Halls) to shake off the complacency of their old perceptions and strike out as innovators in the marketplace. A believer in big ideas, Anderson is unapologetically bold, forging alliances with Facebook, embedding marketers in tech startups in order to harness new technologies for her company's brands, and demanding collaboration and superior work from agency partners. 
 
The May issue of ANA magazine“The idea of fearlessness has been core to Dana for a while,” says Doug Ray, global president of media solutions company Carat, in the cover story of this month’s ANA magazine, which profiles Anderson. Indeed, Anderson names being fearless as one of her seven practices for success.
 
For the remaining six, and the full profile of Anderson, click through to this month’s complimentary issue of ANA magazine
 
Also in this issue: 
Plus! Don’t miss this month’s special section, brought to you by our partner TVB. It’s an infographic on where people spend most of their time consuming media.

No More Excuses

By Urey Onuoha, copywriter, ANA
Posted: May 13, 2015 1:00pm ET

If you had the choice between reading pages of text and watching a short video sharing the same content, which would you be more likely to choose? Chances are you’d go with the video. Video is easily one of the most engaging and compelling content channels, but B-to-B videos haven’t traditionally been recognized for being either of these things. That, however, is rapidly changing. In the latest issue of B-to-B Marketer, we explore how B-to-B marketers can exceed expectations with video content that reflects the brand and is engaging to consumers. In our main feature, No More Excuses, industry experts weigh in on the advantages of video marketing and share advice on the best ways to leverage the platform to achieve your goals.

Also in this issue:

Read the full issue here

Let us know what you think! Contact the editor, Ken Beaulieu.

It’s the brief, stupid!

By Bill Duggan, Group EVP, ANA
Posted: Apr 30, 2015 2:00pm ET

ANA recently conducted parallel surveys among ANA members and agencies on issues related to the client/agency relationship, and the result is the new ANA white paper, “Enhancing Client/Agency Relationships.”  

Perhaps the biggest opportunity identified in this new work centers around one of the most fundamental aspect of the client/agency relationship – assignment briefings that clients provide to agencies. Clients and agencies are not in agreement on whether clients provide clear assignment briefings to agencies. Only 27 percent of agencies believe clients do a good job (and zero percent strongly agree). However, 58 percent of clients think they perform well on briefs.


The brief is the foundation of the agency work product. Over the past year, there have been numerous conversations in ANA committee meetings regarding subpar assignment briefs being developed by clients which, in turn, lead to disappointing work from agencies. Initially, this was a bit of a surprise. The briefing process has been around forever, therefore shouldn’t best practices already be well established and in wide use? Apparently not.

Briefing may be more complicated now than ever. Media is hyper-fragmented, clients are working with multiple agencies, there is more project work, the pace of change is faster than ever, and agencies have been disintermediated to some extent (due to factors including clients using more in-house resources, production decoupling, and clients working directly with media companies).

Agencies emphatically believe that clients do not provide clear assignment briefings. Not a single agency respondent (out of 105), “strongly agreed” that clients provide clear assignment briefings to agencies! Clients must take note of this and commit to change. Bad briefs are frustrating to agencies and cost clients both time and money — for agency rework and the resulting agency fees — not to mention the opportunity costs of subpar creative in the marketplace. Both clients and agencies agree on the importance of better briefing to foster a more-productive client/agency relationship.

ANA will focus attention, going forward, on helping the advertising community improve the assignment briefing process. We’ll work with the 4A’s to strongly incorporate the agency perspective. Deliverables are to be determined but could include:

“Garbage in, garbage out,” is a saying in the industry related to briefs.  Bad briefs usually lead to bad work. ANA looks forward to helping to clean up the garbage.

ANA Perspective

The brief is the foundation of the agency work product. Agencies emphatically believe that clients do not provide clear assignment briefings. Not a single agency respondent (out of 105), “strongly agreed” that clients provide clear assignment briefings to agencies! Clients must take note of this and commit to change. Bad briefs are frustrating to agencies and cost clients both time and money — for agency rework and the resulting agency fees — not to mention the opportunity costs of subpar creative in the marketplace. Both clients and agencies agree on the importance of better briefing to foster a more-productive client/agency relationship.

ANA will focus attention, going forward, on helping the advertising community improve the assignment briefing process. We’ll work with the 4A’s to strongly incorporate the agency perspective. 

A related “pain point” identified in the survey is the client approval process. As we move forward on our work to improve assignment briefings, we’ll also incorporate learning along the way on optimizing the client approval process.

Thanks to The Drum (the UK’s most visited marketing news website) for first publishing this perspective.  

Praise for Pringles

By Jesse Feldman, senior manager of content strategy and partnerships
Posted: Apr 24, 2015 11:30am ET

The ANA’s insights section is now home to all 2015 REGGIE Award-winning case studies. The REGGIE Awards recognize the best marketing campaigns for brand-building, creativity, and results. Click here to browse case studies from categories like loyalty, experiential, sponsorship, small budget, and gamification.

Here are a few of my favorite winning campaigns:

This was the first year that the ANA’s content creation team (including me) worked directly with the  Brand Activation Association (BAA) to copywrite and post the awards. We were sworn to secrecy until the winners were announced, and I’m happy to report there were no leaks.

Imaginary Deadlines, or the Danger of a Nice, Round Number

By Michael Berberich, manager, marketing knowledge center
Posted: Apr 23, 2015 1:30pm ET

In my free time, I write and perform music. And like any good Millennial musician, my act has a Facebook fan page (and a Twitter handle and a SoundCloud page, and…you get it). Thanks to Facebook’s fan page algorithm, content is distributed to less than 10 percent of the fan base, so every new “like” is valuable. However, for some reason I found I only celebrated the “important” milestones, like reaching 400 fans. Why 400? That’s…a good question, actually.

My 400th fan wasn’t a record executive or a musical idol, so why did I consider it a “special” achievement? It’s a round number, of course! Look at all those zeros! The truth is, round numbers seem orderly, and are easy to remember, so we project a certain importance to them. For that same reason, we like memorable deadlines, like the first or last of the month, the Ides of March, whatever. And this is all fine, until these “important” dates interfere with the real-world needs of your brand.

I won’t name names, but recently a major global brand re-hauled the websites for several of its properties, and when they were asked if they’d do anything differently if given the chance, the project lead responded, “My team was in the office almost the entire time between Christmas and New Year’s because someone decided we needed to launch on January first, even though none of our clients would be at work to see it. I’d have fought back harder against ‘imaginary deadlines.’” Debuting on New Year’s Day sounds great on paper, and was probably very satisfying to announce at meetings, but the launch date added zero value to the project, and I’d be willing to bet it made a team full of coders and engineers a little less enthusiastic about the company they work for.

Everyone likes nice round numbers and that’s not going to change. Don’t expect to see brands celebrating their 47th Anniversary any time soon. However, it’s important for business leaders (and everyone, frankly) to remember that their importance is very much “imaginary,” and shouldn’t be put before the real-world need of your brand or your employees. 

Enhancing Client/Agency Relationships – New ANA Research!

By Bill Duggan, Group EVP, ANA
Posted: Apr 23, 2015 10:00am ET

In first quarter 2015, ANA conducted parallel surveys among ANA members and agencies on issues related to the client/agency relationship, resulting in the white paper, “Enhancing Client/Agency Relationships.”  

First, the good news on client/agency relationships. Both clients and agencies agree that:

Further, both clients and agencies agree that the agency is a valued business partner, plays an important role in the client’s business strategy, and is influential in driving business results.

However, there are pockets of dissatisfaction.

Native needs a better yardstick

By Bill Duggan, Group EVP, ANA
Posted: Apr 16, 2015 12:30pm ET

There’s no doubt for anyone in the advertising community that native advertising is hot. Since the ANA (Association of National Advertisers) released the results from its Advertising is Going Native study earlier this year the topic has continued to receive heavy coverage in the industry trades. But despite its increasing popularity, measurement of native advertising has remained a challenge which could hamper further growth.

In the ANA white paper, we asked marketers to identify the metrics they use to measure the impact of their native advertising. The responses were diverse as click-throughs, social media sharing, awareness, and time spent were all employed by at least half the respondents.

When asked to identify the “primary metric” (just one), responses were incredibly fragmented as no metric received more than 17 percent of the responses. That metric was brand lift, followed by click throughs and social media sharing.

No metric stands out as “most important.” Perhaps more concerning is that 26 percent of those engaged in native advertising did not even answer this question, which suggests knowledge gaps on native advertising measurement.

The industry would benefit from a deeper understanding of the metrics that matter most for native. Marketers should fold some measurement component into every native advertising campaign. The closer that a metric can get to a sale, the better. Time spent is good, but awareness is better; brand lift is better than awareness; lead generation is better than brand lift; purchase intent is better than lead generation; and finally, customer acquisition and sales are even better! It would be interesting to see the results of a direct response campaign executed via native advertising.

Meanwhile, publishers are leading the push into native advertising, given the business development potential it represents. Since the average publisher runs many more native advertising campaigns than the average marker, publishers are encouraged to make measurement a priority and help provide measurement insights and best practices with their advertiser and agency partners. It’s unlikely that a single measurement standard will develop for native advertising, given the different goals and priorities of advertisers. Nonetheless, the industry is encouraged to share learning in order to maximize the effectiveness of native and continue the growth trajectory.

Thanks to the Economist for first publishing this perspective in their Lean back marketing blog.

No Laughing Matter

By Andrew Eitelbach, senior manager of marketing and communications
Posted: Apr 10, 2015 10:30am ET

 

Two marketers walk into a bar ...What happens when you combine offbeat humor with a Warren Buffet–infused marketing budget or pick an A-1 frontman like J. K. Simmons? If you’re GEICO and Farmers Insurance, then big, big things.
 
This month’s ANA magazine talks with Ted Ward, chief marketing officer at GEICO, and Michael Linton, chief marketing officer at Farmers, about what makes humor such an effective marketing tool
 
Also in this issue: Yahoo provides insight into best practices for native advertising in this month’s special section; we examine why some Internet-born businesses, like Bonobos and Birchbox are going from clicks to bricks; super, giant, huge, dumfounding, galactic sized numbers behind the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge; what your coworkers are really doing on those conference calls; and more. 
 

Highlights & Insights from 4A’s Transformation

By Bill Duggan, Group EVP, ANA
Posted: Mar 25, 2015 1:30pm ET

I spent a few days in Austin at the 4A’s Transformation conference.  Some event highlights follow.  

Mobile now accounts for 50 percent of all time spent on screens. Jeff Jenkins of Taco Bell called mobile, “The biggest revolution in fast food since the drive through.”

“Purchasing can be a source of good value.  Bring it on,” from Dominic Proctor, GroupM Global.

Tim Armstrong of AOL said that, “Client confusion in the next 20 years will dramatically go up. 4% of media is programmatic; 4% of video viewing is via mobile phones; 4% of the world’s population lives in the U.S.”

“Television is still vital with $370 billion in ad and subscription revenue; 3.8 hours a day viewing per person. Plus, 100% of television is viewable.” This from John Montgomery, GroupM Interaction USA and Chairman of the 4A’s Media Leadership Council.

 My favorite moment of the entire conference was when  Lisa Granatstein, editor of Adweek asked her panel, “What will the ad industry will be talking about a year from now?”

Finally, Nancy Hill of 4A's talked about the importance of trust in the client/agency relationship. She said, “Without trust, we can’t move together.” 

Fraudsters, Liars, and Cheats

By Andrew Eitelbach, senior manager of marketing and communications
Posted: Mar 19, 2015 10:30am ET

 

Who’d want to hack your grandmother? A number of people, actually. She may not be a heavy online shopper or even email much beyond the occasional FW, but with the right malware running on her computer, it and a few million other infected computers can mean serious money for fraudsters. Operating in the background, where she won’t notice, a malicious piece of software is running, pretending to be a human by surfing the web and clicking on ads, inflating click-rates and costing marketers billions. The scam is real, it’s pervasive, and it’s just one of the many dangers that await marketers in the digital space.

Scared? Read this month’s cover story in ANA magazine to see what the dangers are, and how the industry is fighting back. The ANA, along with other major organizations, is leading the charge.

Also in this issue:

Don’t miss this month’s special section, from our partner the United States Postal Service, on direct mail, big data, and omnichannel marketing.

Give us your thoughts on the publication. Contact the editor, Andrew Eitelbach

PLUS: Every issue includes a number of opportunities to share content online; click the Twitter birds scattered through the issue and you’ll find pre-written tweets to make sharing with your followers even easier. Just like this.

Take a look and let us know what you think. You can leave a comment on this blog post, send me an email at aeitelbach@ana.net, or connect with us on Facebook or Twitter. We’d love to get your feedback.


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About This Blog

To complement our two leadership blogs and build dialogue on the seismic changes happening in marketing, we launched Marketing Maestros. Our in-house citizen journalists will talk about everything from marketing technology to accountability and everything in between. This blog is written for marketers by ANA's marketers whose insights are drawn from the voices of the client side marketing community.